Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
German Taurus by ZCochrane German Taurus by ZCochrane
The title is, of course, completely wrong: TAURUS™ is a registered trademark of the ÖBB (Austrian Federal Railways) for this locomotive class, and hence this locomotive is can only be called a Taurus when it's in ÖBB service, which this one isn't. Instead, the correct title for this locomotive is either class 182 or Siemens ES 64 U2. Which is why everybody calls it Taurus...

The story of this locomotive is about as complicated as it gets for modern electrics. DB's first electric locomotive with three-phase AC traction was the class 120, which was designed as a universal locomotive, equally suited for freight trains and fast passenger service. For future models, however, DB abandoned this principle and instead bought a high-speed locomotive, the class 101, and a heavy freight locomotive, the class 152 (as well as a light freight and a commuter locomotive as well as multiple-systems versions, but those aren't really interesting here right now). Technically, the 101 was an Adtranz (now Bombardier) locomotive and the 152 was from Siemens, which means they don't have a lot in common, but capability-wise, they are rather similar: A 101 can do everything a 152 can, it just costs more since it has to have different train protection systems and more complicated trucks for the higher speeds.

Austria's ÖBB went the other route, and got itself one locomotive for all, the class 1016 (single system) or 1116 (dual system) or 1216 (quad system) TAURUS. Technically it was based on the german 152, but suited for high-speed use, and with a very different body since the 152 was considered ugly or at least boring.

Now, DB wanted the 152 approved for service in Austria, which hadn't been a problem for any german electric at this point, since standards are generally compatible. However, the 152 was refused homologation on the grounds that the trucks didn't conform to a UIC standard - which was true, but the 152 was the first locomotive that got in trouble over it ever, and most people suspect that ÖBB just didn't want DB competition. With the need for an austria-capable unit on short notice, DB cancelled the last twenty-five 152s, and instead let Siemens build twenty-five austrian 1116, which were obviously approved for Austria, as the new class 182. With a top speed of 230 kph (143 mph), these are the fastest (the 101 is only allowed 220 kph / 137 mph) and arguably the most beautiful locomotives under the DB umbrella - and if they get lucky, they can haul extreme express freight trains with up to 140 kph (87 mph). They are also dual-voltage capable, for service in Hungary, which is never ever used by DB. One could say these are the most bored locomotives DB has.

Recently, though, there is an ICE shortage, which means all sorts of fast passenger electrics are needed hauling passenger trains as 101s cascade upwards to replace the ICE trains, so the 182s finally can, occasionally, show all their money's worth. Hence, we get 182 024 pulling this InterCity to Hamburg into Cologne central station.

On my homepage
Add a Comment:
 
:icongdupons:
GDupons Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2014
The most amazing thing for me about those locomotives is the sound when they acclerate! It's a scale with several tones!
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2014  Student Photographer
Yeah, that's always fun to hear!
Reply
:iconjsh50:
JSH50 Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2012
Very interesting indeed! Isn't it coming from Hamburg ?
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2012  Student Photographer
I think yes, but I'm not sure on that one. I do know that those Tauri were used on the Hamburg-Cologne line (which seems to be a magnet for unusual rolling stock anyway), and the direction certainly fits.
Reply
:iconjsh50:
JSH50 Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2012
Yes a few years ago there was a Hamburg Stuttgart Hamburg train that produced a DB Taurus passing Cologne at about 10.30 and returning about 18.00
Reply
:icontigrar:
Tigrar Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Gratulation, kommt sicher nicht oft vor =)

Wenn ich einmal dort an der hohenzollernbrücke stehe, das letzte was ich bräuchte wäre eine ES64U2 welche da um die Ecke kommt :D
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2012  Student Photographer
Inzwischen gehören die Dinger alle zu DB Regio Nordost, daher erwarte ich nicht, dass man die so bald wieder hier sieht. Für uns deutsche sind Tauri im Personenverkehr halt was ungewöhnliches. :D
Reply
:icontigrar:
Tigrar Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Ich bin auf die Kombination Taurus+Intercity(o.d. Railjet) schon allergisch :D

Trotzdem drücke ich ab.
Reply
:iconsampug394:
Sampug394 Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
The Bridge in teh Background is Total Awesome
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2010  Student Photographer
Thanks for the :+fav:! :)
Reply
:iconnettwerk:
nettwerk Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
Just curious: do ÖBB still have the Euro-2008 painted Taurus?
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2009  Student Photographer
Good question. I've not heard anything about them repainting any of them, so I guess they do.
Reply
:iconnettwerk:
nettwerk Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
lol, I still remember Portugal's was the only 1016 of the whole pack... :lol:
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2009  Student Photographer
I didn't even know that! Germany was a 1116, I think, but I'm not sure whether there were any 1216s in the herd...
Reply
:iconnettwerk:
nettwerk Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
I had the list around here, lemme check...
*searches hard-drive*
Ah!, here it is:

1016.025 - Portugal
1116.003 - France
1116.005 - Austria
1116.007 - Greece
1116.029 - Sweden
1116.031 - Turkey
1116.036 - Germany
1116.041 - Holland
1116.056 - Romania
1116.075 - Switzerland
1116.080 - UEFA
1116.084 - Russia
1116.087 - Poland
1116.108 - Croatia
1116.232 - Spain
1216.004 - Italy
1216.226 - Czech Republic
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2009  Student Photographer
A, thank you! So there were some 1216 in this.
Reply
:iconnettwerk:
nettwerk Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
;)
I don't know if there was another locomotive involved in that campaign, but I couldn't find records anywhere.
Reply
:iconp3rsh1ng:
p3rsh1ng Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009
3 phase AC? How does that work? There has to be one phase in the wires and the oher two in each rail, doesn't it. But how come the phases in the tracks don't get short-circuited?
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009  Student Photographer
No, it works completely differently. There is only a single phase from the overhead lines. This is what the locomotive picks up. Then it converts this internally to DC, and from that to three-phase AC which then actually drives the motors.

The few instances where people have actually used three phases had either double overhead lines (for example in Italy) or even three overhead lines (an experimental line in Germany). Since that was way too much work, nobody uses that anymore.

Thank you for the :+fav: here! :)
Reply
:iconp3rsh1ng:
p3rsh1ng Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009
Isn't all the transforming just too complicated? And doesn't too much power go to waste? I guess DC is transformed into the 3-phase AC via a motor-driven alternator, isn't it?

When I was still a little brat I thought electric trains gain power solely from overhead wires and thus I imagined 2 lined traction mains. But such concept would need different pantographs (like a trolley-bus) and I still cannot grasp how come it doesn't create a short-circuit on such lines...

...and you're welcome ^w^
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009  Student Photographer
No, the DC-to-3-phase conversion happens with computer-controlled semiconductors. The advantage to that is that 3-phase AC motors are the smallest, least problematic and least heavy ones you can find. They just hadn't been used in trains before since to control their direction and speed, you have to control the frequency of the 3-phase current that's fed into them. With modern computers and static converters, that is no longer a problem, though. In fact, modern locomotives such as this one will have four DC-to-3-phase-AC converters: One for each wheel set, so that the speed of each axle can be controlled individually, for best performance.
Reply
:iconp3rsh1ng:
p3rsh1ng Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009
Each axle? Isn't that a bit unnecessary. In the end you'll end up at a situation when one or 2 axles still slips on the tracks and there's not much you can do about it...

Rainy or snowy weather can be horrible :iconlll-plz:
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009  Student Photographer
Well, as soon as one axle slips you can automatically reduce the power put into it, and only this particular axle. At least that's the theory, but it seems to work. Modern electrics with four axles only, but with such three-phase-AC traction, haul trains that used to have two six-axle diesel locomotives over heavy grades around here in Aachen.
Reply
:iconp3rsh1ng:
p3rsh1ng Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009
O_O :iconsaywhaplz:
Reply
:icongundam-genki:
gundam-genki Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
You have a great way of combining multiple elements in one picture... I'll have to try this myself someday...

Now only to find a good 'secondary object' ^_^

:+fav:!
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009  Student Photographer
Well, in Cologne with the huge bridge it's rather easy - that's why I like the station so much. Thank you for the :+fav:!
Reply
:iconrobertbeardwell:
robertbeardwell Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009  Hobbyist Artist
Nice i like how the bridge is shown in the background :D
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009  Student Photographer
First of all, thank you for any :+fav:s that I haven't thanked you for yet!

Showing the bridge as well was one of my goals. It's too bad that it's so much in the fog, although I think this makes the locomotive stand out more. The green electrification pole on the left, which partly hides the side of the bridge, however, is very annoying, but they wouldn't let me chop it down... :D
Reply
:iconrobertbeardwell:
robertbeardwell Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009  Hobbyist Artist
Lol, i know what you mean about certain things that get in the way of a train photograph, like the "Way Out" sign on this one, [link]
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009  Student Photographer
Yes, exactly!
Reply
:iconrobertbeardwell:
robertbeardwell Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009  Hobbyist Artist
I thinks its a Train Photographer thing were parts of the railway get in the way, and we get annoyed, but i have to say that people still take great photographs :)
Reply
:iconseptdeneuf:
Septdeneuf Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009
Ach das ist ein Taurus? Ist ja so rund. Ich hatte immer irgendwie gedacht, dass die kantige E-lok die dich nervt der Taurus wäre. Wieder was dazugelernt.

Nebenbei, das mit dem ICE shortage glaub ich dir nicht. Wenn ein ICE 3 ersatzzug für nen stinknormalen IC wird, dann klingt das nicht so, als hätten die zu wenig davon.
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009  Student Photographer
Die kantige Elok, von der es hier so viel gibt, ist die Traxx. Traxx != Taurus. Taurus mag ich, und ja, ist sehr rund.

Na ja, im Durchschnitt sind die ICEs im Augenblick noch knapp, es variiert sehr nach Gegend. In Köln merkst du auch nichts davon, aber in Ostdeutschland werden die ICEs teilweise durch alte Doppelstockwagen ersetzt.
Reply
:iconraakone:
Raakone Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009
Very nice pic. I love the angle. And an interesting story behind it. So OBB gives special names to their units? I guess it's kind of like what the UK does with many of its MUs (although if more than one company has them, they can share the name), or some named types of units in North America...most notably the Rail Diesel Car (built by Budd), one of the only DMUs we ever had, different railroads gave them different names, they were Dayliners on CP (VIA Rail still uses that name on the RDC routes it has), Railliners on CN, Beeliners on NYC, and Speedliners on the B & O, for example. Is TAURUS used in OBB informational literature or advertising? *curious*
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009  Student Photographer
Thank you! Only the newest two locomotives, the TAURUS and the class 2016 HERKULES diesel locomotive, have received names for advertising purposes. Their manufacturer's model numbers are far less interesting, so everyone uses the advertisement names instead.

Generally speaking, it's not usual for locomotive classes to have such a name, but newer DMUs and EMUs all have names, such as the Bombardier Talent, Siemens Desiro, Alstom Coradia, Stadler FLIRT (that one gets the price for worst name, I'd say) and so on. A few of these names also appear in the UK, although it's usually for very different trains there.
Reply
:iconherrdrayer:
HerrDrayer Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
I see the Austrian model in Frankfurt all the time...at the head end of a EuroCity train recently arrived from somewhere in Austria. Curiously though, the train arrives in Frankfurt motor first, then leaves its motor behind and departs Frankfurt with another Lok on the head end. I never bothered to see if the 'replacement' power was also a 182.
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009  Student Photographer
Well, it would make sense, but of course it's possible that the Tauri leave Frankfurt on some different train. Thank you for the two :+fav:s!
Reply
:iconherrdrayer:
HerrDrayer Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
I think it has to do with the Eurocity equipment running without a cab car, so they probably have some kind of tag team set up where the Taurus left behind today gets coupled to the opposite end of tomorrow's train back to Austria.
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009  Student Photographer
Yes, such plans can even grow to have four-day cycles and more, so that's quite possible.
Reply
:iconamosis55:
amosis55 Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009
I love that bridge.
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009  Student Photographer
Yes, it's the nicest railroad bridge I know of, at least in my area. Thank you for the :+fav:! :)
Reply
:iconamosis55:
amosis55 Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009
You're Welcome. I'd love to see some other shots of the bridge if you have them.
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009  Student Photographer
Oh, it's one of my favorite subjects. If you use the search on this gallery for "Hohenzollernbrücke", then you'll find a lot, but I think there are even more if you just look around. I plan to post some more later today as well.
Reply
:iconamosis55:
amosis55 Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2009
Thanks.
Reply
:iconeisenmann87:
Eisenmann87 Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
Wow, das ist die erste DB Taurus die ich sehe. :D
Reply
:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009  Student Photographer
Die Biester sind aber auch schwer zu finden. :D Ist glaube ich auch der erste Taurus, von dem ich ein Bild hier habe.

Vielen Dank für das :+fav:! :)
Reply
:iconeisenmann87:
Eisenmann87 Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
Gerne doch. :)
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×




Details

Submitted on
February 15, 2009
Image Size
926 KB
Resolution
1500×1000
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
2,184 (1 today)
Favourites
34 (who?)
Comments
47
Downloads
460

Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS 1000D
Shutter Speed
1/64 second
Aperture
F/5.6
Focal Length
23 mm
ISO Speed
200
Date Taken
Feb 15, 2009, 5:22:59 PM

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.
×